The Secular Humanists of the Lowcountry

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SHL Press Release: Good Works in Non-Mysterious Ways

Charleston, SC (12/01/2014) -- When the Secular Humanists of the Lowcountry's first billboard appeared in January 2009, the mere fact that a group of atheists, agnostics and freethinkers were posting a billboard on the main highway in South Carolina's "Holy City" was big news. It not only was discussed in the local media, it made the front page of the New York Times.

"The purpose of that first billboard," says SHL Board Member Alex Kasman, "was just to make our presence known to other non-theists in the area who might want to join our group but did not know we exist." The message on that billboard simply said "Don't Believe in God? You are not alone."

"Our second billboard," Kasman continues, "was more a matter of pride, about our 20th anniversary." That billboard, which appeared earlier this year, advertised a big party held to celebrate the group's founding in 1994.

But, the third billboard attempts to serve a different purpose all-together. According the SHL's vice-president and founder, Herb Silverman, "Some people know only what we don't believe, rather than what we do believe. This new billboard shows that like many people, our members believe that doing good is its own reward."

Their new message, which will appear on an electronic billboard along I-26 beginning in early December, plays on a familiar phrase and says "Good works in non-mysterious ways." SHL has received recognition for their monthly volunteer activities and quarterly charitable fundraisers. They won second place among civic groups at the Scarecrows on the Square in Summerville, they received an award from Volunteers Beyond Belief for their many volunteer efforts in 2013 including a major project at the Palmetto House family shelter, and in 2012 they were the top fundraising team for Light the Night.

"Everyone can see how these sorts of projects help those in need and make the world a better place," says Kasman. "They can be supported by people regardless of their religious beliefs or non-beliefs and regardless of political affiliation. And that's what we hope people will think about when they read the message."

Webmaster: Alex Kasman 2016